36 Hours in Sacramento

With its thriving cultural scene, striking architecture and lush vegetation, this often overlooked California city — the photogenic backdrop of the movie “Lady Bird” — has much to offer the weekend visitor.
As written in the New York Times.

As a travel destination, California’s capital gets no respect. Despite sitting at the confluence of two impressive rivers, with sprawling shade trees that make much of the city feel like a leafy urban park, Sacramento has a misplaced reputation as a lowly, unattractive place. But the state’s oldest incorporated city — founded in 1849, the year before California joined the union — remains a lush oasis of bougainvillea and palms, prolific fruit trees and mighty oaks.

It also has a thriving cultural scene and architectural character all its own. Along with neighborhoods of midcentury modern homes, Craftsman Bungalows and ornate Victorians, there’s the birthplace of Tower Records (the Art Deco Tower Theatre and its kitschy, colorful Tower Cafe are both still operating) and the Crocker Art Museum’s bright white, modernist expansion, the 125,000-square-foot Teel Family Pavilion, which tripled the museum’s size in 2010. Unlike California’s glittering, glamorous coastal cities, Sacramento’s location in the Central Valley gives it an earnest, small-town affect and a welcome lack of pretension.

Friday
1) 3 p.m. LAY OF THE LAND
With few hills and wide, tree-shaded streets, Sacramento is an unusually bikeable city. The JUMP dockless e-bike share program ($1 for the first 15 minutes, 7 cents a minute after that) began just last month, but may become the best bet for getting around “the Grid” (as Sacramento’s core is known), Davis and West Sacramento.

The Crocker is the city’s must-see institution, but make your first stop the smaller California Museum ($9), which is based at the State Archives and is home to the California Hall of Fame, which, besides celebrating famous Californians, offers an overview of the state’s history from the Spanish missions era to Japanese internment during World War II, indigenous peoples to Hollywood’s Red Scare. Afterward, take a walk through the 40-acre, Victorian-style Capitol Park, where there is a trout pond, a cactus garden and a collection of native plants representing every county in this heterogenous state.

2) 4:30 p.m. CALIFORNIA CRAFTED
Cruise down to the R Street Corridor, a former railroad yard and industrial area, now home to intriguing shops and designers. For hyper-curated outdoor clothing and gear with a city-streets-meets-Redwood forests sensibility — think fleece sweatshirts in vibrant colors — head to the All Good flagship store, which also organizes hiking, surfing and bouldering trips in California and beyond.

Down the street, the Warehouse Artist Lofts Public Market has a small but enticing food court with excellent poke — the Hawaiian-style raw fish salad that’s sweeping California — at Fish Face Poke Bar and an exciting collection of shops: midcentury wares and records at Kicksville Vinyl & Vintage, where you can find everything from 45s to atomic age lamps; and fabulously retro vintage clothing at Old Gold. For admirers of bespoke clothing, Benjamins crafts shoes — like a $375 boot made of leather from the Chicago tannery Horween, which takes 16 to 20 weeks to deliver — on site.

3) 5:30 p.m. BEER-THIRTY
Sacramento is flush with beer. Try New Helvetia, named for the city’s original moniker. The brewery has a neighborhood feel, complete with backyard picnic tables, a devoted running club and a resident mascot dog named Moose (there’s a session I.P.A. named in his honor). Bike Dog in industrial West Sacramento is popular with bicyclists, dogs and serious beer geeks.

For a funky outdoor beer garden with communal tables imported from Germany and a shipping container kitchen, Der Biergarten, has 32 taps of mostly German beer and a menu that includes classics like currywurst ($8.06) and schnitzel ($12.67). There’s even Sac Brew Bike, a mobile pub that tours beer bars and resembles a pedal-powered trolley that can seat up to 15 people. Tours start at $27 a seat.

4) 6:30 p.m. HAMBURGER HAPPINESS
Contrary to restaurant lore and signage, Broderick Roadhouse was not established in 1893. It actually started as a food truck in 2012 and, on the strength of its hamburger game, quickly grew into a small and beloved local chain. The original West Sacramento location retains the charm of a Western relic. If you come earlier for the 3 to 6 p.m. happy hour, the towering Old School burger and tap beer special ($10) is a steal.

5) 8 p.m. SHOWTIME
Catch a show at The Sofia Tsakopoulos Center for the Arts (tickets, $9 to $46), the new performing arts complex by the 30-year-old B Street Theatre. The two-theater venue includes both the 250-seat main stage and the 365-seat Sutter Theatre for Children, which will host “family series” shows at 1 p.m. on Saturday and Sundays. For serious post-theater cocktails, red velvet curtains, pressed tin ceilings, a horseshoe-shaped wooden bar and live music — blues, jazz, big band and country — on weekend nights (starting at 9 p.m.), Shady Lady Saloon may be Sacramento’s sexiest cocktail bar.

Saturday
6) 10 a.m. For the Road
Grab coffee at Temple Coffee Roasters, a highfalutin caffeine palace that opened its grandest location — which includes a floor hand-laid with 500,000 pennies — in 2016 in an 1880s building in the trendy Midtown neighborhood. Coffee snobs will find Kyoto slow-drip and a custom tap system for Nitrogen-infused coffees and teas. Then get a picnic lunch for the road at Roxie’s Deli & BBQ, an East Sacramento corner store with a retro feel and sandwiches that will feed two adults for less than $10. A local favorite is the messy Meatball Mafia sandwich ($9.65) with smashed meatballs, provolone and Parmesan cheeses, topped with tomatoes, onions and jalapeños.

7) 12 p.m. GET OUTTA TOWN
The paved, 32-mile Jedediah Smith Memorial Trail starts in Old Sacramento’s Discovery Park and travels along the American River, a tubing hot spot during the scorching summer months. Stop at the Nimbus Hatchery, which raises steelhead trout and Chinook salmon, and has a nature trail. If you’re up for an ambitious ride (or a short drive), continue all the way to the town of Folsom — of Johnny Cash prison song fame — which is loaded with Gold Country character.

8) 5 p.m. TACOS AL FRESCO
For a quick, quintessentially California snack, head to Chando’s, a small local chain of taco stands where you can grab three flavorful street-food-style tacos — like “The Ensenada,” with fried fish and cabbage, birria (spicy stewed goat) and vegetarian options like spinach or potato — and a fountain drink for just $7.49. Take your meal to the recently renovated pond at nearby McKinley Park, where 1,200 rose bushes in bloom from March through May. The garden was featured in Greta Gerwig’s 2017 film “Lady Bird”— a love letter to her hometown — which has inspired walking and running tours of the film’s locations.

9) 7 p.m. STADIUM CITY
Many cities have beloved sports teams, but few treat sports events — even minor league baseball games — as much like a night life activity as Sacramento, where eating a Merlino’s freeze while watching a River Cats game at West Sacramento’s Raley Field is a favorite way to spend an evening. In 2016, the country got its first solar-powered sports stadium when the Golden 1 Center opened in Sacramento, transforming the city’s downtown with an indoor-outdoor design that includes five towering, fully-retractable glass doors. The $500 million-plus arena hosts the Kings N.B.A. team, as well as big-name musical acts like Paul McCartney, Ariana Grande and John Mayer.
10) 10 p.m. PLAYING WITH FIRE
In the Southside Park neighborhood, Binchoyaki is a sassy little izakaya, where perky 1960s-era oldies play and the open kitchen makes the compact dining room feel like a party. Specializing in Japanese-style charcoal grilled skewers, the restaurant serves salty, umami-packed bites of pork jowl, chicken gizzard, beef tongue, bacon-wrapped enoki mushrooms and more (starting at $1.50). A testament to the restaurant’s mom-and-pop, handmade impulse, the bar is lined with planter trays sprouting mung beans and pickling jars of beet-colored daikon and shochu liquor infused with umi (plum). From 10 p.m. to midnight, there’s a $1 oyster happy hour on weekend nights.

Sunday
11) 8 a.m. THE THREE Bs
Bacon & Butter, in the Tahoe Park neighborhood, is worth both the trek and the inevitable brunch lines. The seasonal menu changes frequently, but might include, as it has in the recent past, a FGT benny (fried green tomato and ham hock with baby arugula, poached eggs, corn and béarnaise sauce, $15) and chili verde hash with tomatillo-stewed pork butt, black beans, pasilla chile, eggs, baby squash and corn ($17). After breakfast, head to Asha Urban Baths, an Old World-style, coed, swimming suit-required bathhouse with a soaking pool, sauna, steam room, sauna and cold plunge. Drop-in admission is $25.

12) 12:30 p.m. ALL ABOARD FOR ART
Head to Amtrak’s Sacramento Valley Station, a 1926 Renaissance Revival train station that just received a major face-lift, and hop the Capitol Corridor train 15 minutes west to the college town of Davis. From the 1913 Mission Revival Davis Station, it’s a 20-minute walk to the new Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art, which opened in 2016 at the University of California, Davis. The museum’s porous, light-filled Grand Canopy design is itself a work of art. A recent exposition included John Cage’s first participatory composition, “33 1/3,” which debuted at U.C. Davis in 1969.

LODGING
Kimpton opened its first Sacramento property, The Sawyer Hotel (500 J Street; 916-545-7100; sawyerhotel.com) last year. Each of the 250 guest rooms (starting at $159) are pet-friendly and equipped with a yoga mat, while the third-floor pool has cabanas and views of the Golden 1 Center.

HI Sacramento Hostel (925 H Street; 916-668-6631; hiusa.org) is an exceptional option for budget travelers. Housed in an 1885 Victorian mansion, just blocks from downtown’s César Chávez Plaza, where there are concerts in the park during the summer, a bed in a shared dorm costs just $32, while private rooms start at $56, breakfast included.

Sacramento’s Beer Garden is a great place for socializing

Sacramento’s Beer Garden known as Der Biergarten is a unique place, one of a kind, a great place to hang out and socialize. Here is what you will find at this great spot.

Sacramento's Beer Garden

Sacramento’s Beer Garden

Great German beer and foods
Der Biergarten is uniquely German; you can get some of the best German beers as well as light German fare. The spot offers a German menu with 32 beers on draft, and German traditional cuisine all while you relax in one of Midtown Sacramento’s best beer destinations. This is the place that you will find the most German beers in Northern California.

It is 100% outdoors
This is a place where you’ll have a chance to socialize over some great beer and food, enjoying the sunlight by day and counting the stars at night. It’s a spot that has a natural environment, a cool place where you can down your drinks as you chat with your friends. Enjoy the fresh air, watch the sunset and count the stars as you sip your favorite German drink. It’s a true definition of outdoor dining and entertainment.

A cool spot
When you want to have a good chat with your friends, this is the joint of choice; it has no television, music or dance floor. It’s a place where you can have a good time without having to shout at the top of your lungs in competition with blaring music. You won’t be interrupted by television ads or programs; it will be all beer, food and wonderful socialization. You’ll have a wonderful time sitting with friends, playing a game and socializing; the atmosphere is so good, you’re sure to love it.

Der Biergarten is not just human-friendly; you are allowed to bring your dog. There are no restrictions; you can enjoy your German beer while in the company of your pet friend. You don’t have to leave your lovely pet in the house unattended or in the car; this is a cool place to hang out with friends and lovely pets too.

Another first at the Der Biergarten, it was the first cargo container structure built to be used as a business in Sacramento, CA.

If you’re looking for real fun and excitement while you play games, the best German beer and food as well as a wonderful and cool atmosphere, Der Biergarten fits the bill!

Free Pretzel At Der Biergarten In Sacramento!

So you need something to eat when you are drinking that great beer. We have the deal for you! Simply sign up for our text club and get a free pretzel code sent to you on your cell phone. Simply text Beer to 85775. One per person please.

pretzal2

Top 5 Beer Gardens in The USA

If beer is something you love, then things don’t get much better than spending time in a beer garden. With variety in beer, casual atmosphere, and lots of like-minded people, beer gardens are the go-to way to relax for any beer lover. Though beer gardens are generally awesome places to be, finding the right garden can be a bit of a task. So, to help you find the best we’ve weeded out the bad ones and crafted a list of the top 5 in the country.

 

1) Der Biergarten:

Sacramento Beer Garden at night

Der Biergarten In Sacramento at night

Located in sunny Sacramento California, Der Biergarten takes the cake for best overall beer garden. With an authentic German vibe and an unmatched selection of 32 beer varieties, Der Biergarten is a true beer lover’s paradise. Without blaring music or annoying televisions, the wide open space at this garden is perfect for socializing, making it as pleasant to the ears and eyes as it is to the taste buds. Germans are notorious for their amazing beer, and nothing makes a better pair than beer and sausages. Der Biergarten not only provides this pairing, but the sausages are brought in direct from Sacramento’s best butcher.

 

 

2) Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden:

New York Beer Garden

Located in Queens, New York, it is known as one of the oldest beer gardens in New York. Previously it was a European social club, but now it’s a favorite spot for beer-loving New Yorkers. The beer list is rather extensive, and the fare is catered toward hipsters, artists and yuppies. Overall, if you find yourself in Queens this is one of the gardens to check out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) Scholz Garten:

Texas Beer Garden in Austin

Austin Texas Beer Garden

Located in Austin, Texas, this is another garden that has roots surrounding Bavaria. It is the oldest continually operating business in all of Austin so patrons know it’s worth checking out. Austin is known for its western influences, and the exterior of this garden displays that theme rather pleasantly. Inside, patrons are transported to Bavaria with bench seating and enough beer to make them forget that they aren’t actually in Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) :

Lowry Beer Garden

Located in Denver, Colorado, this beer garden stays true to the fame that surrounds Denver’s craft brew scene. They’ve decided to stick hard and fast to evolution, and they’re always updating their offering list to appease the variety of people that come and visit this exciting attraction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5) Sheffield’s: Located in Chicago, Illinois, this final garden has achieved acclaim from a variety of magazines, including Food & Wine. It’s one of the only gardens in the country that doesn’t care about cold weather. While most gardens will close when winter comes, Sheffield’s remains open, offering their assortment of beers to be enjoyed by their bonfire with some freshly cooked barbeque. When the summer comes back to town, they offer an assortment of live outdoor music for patrons to party to while they enjoy their beer.

 

America is the melting pot of people groups and cultures, and with this list of beer gardens you’ll be able to find the best place for you. Regardless of where you decide to go, make sure to drink responsibly.

New German-themed bar looks to open in Midtown, Sacramento

Article released in Sacramento State Hornet newspaper.

Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2013 12:00 am

Kaitlin Bruce

Der Biergarten, opening up on the corner of 24th and K streets in Midtown, has promise to be a unique eatery Sacramento has not yet to seen.

Sean Derfield, owner of the River City Saloon,has been developing the idea since 2011 when he decided to build a German-themed beer house in the European open-air fashion.

Derfield said the new beer house will resemble San Francisco’s Proxy, a model of urban planning that demonstrates how a business can be successful by transforming underused areas like empty lots.

“It’s a beer garden that Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom came up with,” Derfield said. “(Proxy) used cargo containers for the architecture, and I thought, ‘What a great idea.’”

Thomas Roth, property manager of the plot agreed to the project because he thought it was such an interesting plan.

“This is a major corner in Sacramento,” Roth said. “The city is not used to shipping containers for buildings. It’s going to be great.”

But the project has been anything but easy to accomplish. Derfield said he has hit his share of speed bumps, mostly because of the use of the open cargo containers.

“Our plans kept getting kicked back with the city and health department, saying we couldn’t do this, couldn’t do that,” Derfield said. “Every time we objected to something, they had a different excuse.”

The plans to open before summer were delayed and Derfield was forced to open the exposed garden right before winter.

“It turns out that if you’re the first one to do something like this, they have to absolutely make sure it’s getting done right,” Derfield said.

One of the most exciting things about Der Biergarten is that it of only two beer gardens in Sacramento. Low Brau, located on 20th Street, opened last November.

Local restaurateurs, like Golden Bear’s executive chef, Matthew Brown, have also shown support and are anxiously waiting for the new beer garden to open.

“Everybody over here is excited and just waiting for it to open so they can check it out,” Brown said.

The garden will include concession style food, an open porch to sit and foosball and ping-pong tables.

“It’s an urban beer garden,” Derfield said. “It’s not traditional, we won’t be walking around in lederhosen.”

Derfield said the most important part of the business is its unique drafts.

“All the beer we are going to have you can’t just get at the bar down the street,” Derfield said. “We’ll have local favorites like Track 7 and New Helvetia, Pliny the Elder is a hot one too.”

Der Biergarten certainly promises to be something Sacramentans have not quite seen, especially for a traditional beer hall with an urban twist.

Although there has not been a specific opening date, those interested can go to www.beergardensacramento.com for more information.

Kaitlin Bruce can be reached at statehornetcommunity@gmail.com

opening soon

beer garden sacramento